Standing with Prejean in the Fight for What’s Right

Rebecca Hagelin

Rebecca Hagelin

Rebecca Hagelin’s latest column at TownHall takes a look at the struggles, triumphs and failures of former Miss California Carrie Prejean.

Prejean was launched to national fame several months ago when, during a Miss USA pageant, she was asked a question about homosexual “marriage” by a judge who was a homosexual activist.

When Prejean gave a meek, polite answer than also stated her conviction that marriage is between a man and a woman, the PC forces of pop-culture “wisdom” launched one of the most vicious attacks ever seen in America.

During the course of this ongoing scorched-earth campaign against her, the Left has attacked her concerning things she has done that, if done by one of their own, would be applauded by them…if noticed at all. These things include some racy photos she had taken privately which later became public, and some sort of “sex tape” she made in the past which has also become public.

Unlike the smut-merchants on the Left, Prejean has not defended these mistakes as being moral. She has admitted her error in doing these things, which is the correct response.

Prejean is not perfect, but she–like all of us who are willing to admit our moral failures–is trying to walk more and more in harmony with her faith. Unfortunately for her, while most of us get to live through this system of failures and successes in private, or at least with only our close associates as witnesses to our failures, Prejean has to do this in public…and under the full microscope of an extremely hostile pop-culture bent on destroying one of their own who has, in their minds, turned on them.

Hagalin has this to say about Prejean’s public trials:

Carrie’s book, “Still Standing” reveals a courageous woman whose Christian faith is still in its infancy. She was thrust into the national spotlight and all too quickly became a heroine for those who are sick and tired of Hollywood and the thought police. Unable to yet see the disconnect between her desire to be a “Victoria’s Secret Angel” and the biblical morality she professes, Carrie is painfully discovering truth as she goes. Eager to support a young woman so viciously attacked, many supporters also missed the disparity between the sexy image Carrie loves to be and the virtuous woman she seems to want to become. As Carrie matures and becomes more sensitive to which behaviors reflect her faith and which ones tarnish it, she is learning the difference under glaring lights, scowling faces and an unforgiving media.

I had the pleasure and honor of meeting Rebecca Hagelin a couple of months ago at the Values Voter Summit in Washington D.C., introduced by a mutual friend after Hagelin spoke at the event. She is every bit as nice as she seems in her columns, and she is a very wise woman.

Hagelin points out that while some of us might be tempted to write-off Prejean for her failures, we should not give in to this temptation, but should instead stand with her and encourage her as she “continues to suffer, “grow up”, fall and stand back up in front of the entire world.”

When I realized the error of my ways and turned my life and will over to Christ, it took some time before I began to realize and overcome many of my erroneous ways.  For many months thereafter, I still said and did things that embarrass me now to think about, but I was a spiritual child still learning my way.  And still today I sometimes do things I know are wrong because I give in to the temptation of their siren call.  These things to not become “right” because I do them; they are still wrong, and I become wrong in doing them.  The standard does not change.

The immoral world does not understand–and does not want to understand–that while no human being can ever fully live up to the standard of what is right, that standard is nevertheless the correct one.  The gutter-merchants also have no interest in acknowledging that when some people promote the proper standard, they are not (hopefully) holding themselves up as an icon of that standard, but are merely trying to remind others of that standard and to point them to it for their own health and benefit.  They only want to remove an unpleasant reminder of their own moral failure.

Pretending the standard does not exist in a vain attempt to escape responsibility to that standard is not the act of a mature, rational human being.

It makes no more sense than the person who habitually speeds through a school zone, pretending that the standard does not apply to them. Sooner or later, the consequences for violating the standard will catch up with them–and others may be hurt in the process, as well as the judgment they face.

Pretending the standard does not exist in a vain attempt to escape responsibility to that standard is not the act of a mature, rational human being.
It makes no more sense than the person who habitually speeds through a school zone, pretending that the standard does not apply to them. Sooner or later, the consequences for violating the standard will catch up with them–and others may be hurt in the process, as well as the judgment they face
Pretending the standard does not exist in a vain attempt to escape responsibility to that standard is not the act of a mature, rational human being.

This is something our American culture once instinctively understood as our mutual obligation…but to our detriment has nearly completely forgotten.

Prejean is not perfect. I am not perfect. You are not perfect.  But we are not called to be perfect before we carry out our commission to tell the truth about the standard of truth and what is right.

Read Hagelin’s entire column here.

4 Responses to “Standing with Prejean in the Fight for What’s Right”

  1. Rebecca Hagelin has written a fine column on Carrie Prejean and the release of her new book. (The new book has Prejean doing the media rounds.) Hagelin gives credit where it is due, but points out the obvious—that you can’t tell the world that your goal is to be a Victoria’s Secret angel and hope to have credibility when you proclaim your Christian faith.

    The issue for Carrie is not so much the past as it is the present. As I have repeatedly stated on Crosstalk as late as last week, you cannot profess to be a Christian and demand respect for your supposedly pro-family views when you’ve been cavorting in a naked fashion in front of millions of men. Breast-enhancement surgery for purposes of engendering male lust is no way to represent Jesus Christ.

    Pro-family leaders (primarily male) made fools of themselves by publicly championing Carrie as the new face (and body) of conservative values. This was clearly a mistake. Featuring Carrie at the Values Voter Summit just before the sex tape announcement was rather ironic. “Nothing is private,” complained Carrie in a TV interview last week. No, Carrie, not even privates are private.

    For the sake of Carrie’s soul, somebody needs to explain the rudiments of the biblical gospel to her. (Family values are not the gospel.) Her mentor can move on from there to help her understand biblical modesty and decency. Christ has been mocked and shamed, not because Carrie stood up for traditional marriage, but because she did so in a barely-there bikini.

  2. Most of what you said has truth to it, but the fact is
    Christians are held to higher standards because thay claim to have a higher morality. A pagan, like myslf, doesn't claim that , so we are not held to such high standards. Many see her not as a slughtly mixed up, fallen creature, but a hypocrite. Could there be an element of both ? I don't know her, nor do most of us, so who can say for sure. Lets give her the benefit of the doubt, but in the mean time, it might be best for her to take a step back and rethink things a little for her own spiritual and mental health.

    I think your comment that ' American culture once instinctively understood' such predicaments as she finds her self in, is way off. Had she done an equivalent act in the days of our Founding Fathers, she would have been ostracised by most Christians far and near. The Puritans stockaded people for less. Can you imagine if she had done this in the 1880's or 1950's or any time until fairly recently.The truth appears to be that Christians are becoming more tolerant of such behavior or adhering to scripture more and seeing such things as an act of a fallen,mixed up creature. Christian Americans in the past would have instinctively rejected her for making sex tapes, but now they don't in most part.That is a good thing. It is a Biblical thing.

  3. There's some validity in the explanation of the misperception concerning Christians that you outlined, but it remains that: a misperception (and in some cases, I don't think those afflicted with it are interested in correcting their perception–the misperception is too convenient to their excuse of immoral conduct).

    Also, what I said was “instinctively understood” was not the immoral act she committed, but the fact that we cannot pretend standards do not apply to us, nor can we expect that violating standards will not eventually catch up to us.

    Incidentally, it is also true that Americans once “instinctively understood” that when a person fails to live up to a standard they have espoused, that in no way invalidates the standard; only their performance in measuring up to it.

    While we shouldn't throw Carrie out for her moral failure in this are (whether it was before or after she became a Christian, I do not now, and that would have some relevance), Christians should nevertheless remain committed to acknowledging that the standard of moral behavior does not permit this. The standard does not change, no matter how many people may violate it, nor how many people may pretend it doesn't exist.

    Unfortunately, a whole lot of folks are going to realize that when it's too late.

  4. There's some validity in the explanation of the misperception concerning Christians that you outlined, but it remains that: a misperception (and in some cases, I don't think those afflicted with it are interested in correcting their perception–the misperception is too convenient to their excuse of immoral conduct).

    Also, what I said was “instinctively understood” was not the immoral act she committed, but the fact that we cannot pretend standards do not apply to us, nor can we expect that violating standards will not eventually catch up to us.

    Incidentally, it is also true that Americans once “instinctively understood” that when a person fails to live up to a standard they have espoused, that in no way invalidates the standard; only their performance in measuring up to it.

    While we shouldn't throw Carrie out for her moral failure in this are (whether it was before or after she became a Christian, I do not now, and that would have some relevance), Christians should nevertheless remain committed to acknowledging that the standard of moral behavior does not permit this. The standard does not change, no matter how many people may violate it, nor how many people may pretend it doesn't exist.

    Unfortunately, a whole lot of folks are going to realize that when it's too late.