South Dakota Group Announces Opposition to Repeal of Embryonic Stem Cell Research Ban

A colony of embryonic stem cells, from the H9 cell line (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

A colony of embryonic stem cells, from the H9 cell line (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Proposed measure would create giant loop hole in existing statewide cloning ban

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 12, 2009

Sioux Falls, SD – On Thursday, The Coalition for Cures Not Cloning, joined by Dr. Mick Vanden Bosch, current state legislator Manny Steele (R), former state legislator Mary Glenski (D), and other organizations, announced their opposition to an effort which, if approved, would allow cloning on the 2010 ballot.  According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, South Dakota’s current codified law is one of the nation’s strictest cloning bans in the country.  Currently, adult stem cell research is allowed by state law, embryonic stem cell research and cloning are prohibited.  The initiated measure would overturn the ban on embryonic stem cell research and allow cloning.

Family Policy Council Action President Chris Hupke states “the proposed measure would drive a Texas-sized loop hole in South Dakota’s current cloning ban that was passed in 2004.  Make no mistake, this measure uses sleight of hand to rewrite the definition of cloning.”  Former legislator Mary Glenski adds, “I voted for the current cloning ban in the state legislature as part of an overwhelming bi-partisan majority with only one legislator voting against it.”  Current legislator Manny Steele also states, “this measure does not strengthen the current cloning ban, it weakens the ban.  I urge citizens to refuse to sign the petition to get the measure on the statewide ballot.”

The proposed initiated measure would result in research dollars being diverted from current adult stem cell research that is yielding results and curing patients.  Embryonic stem cell research has yielded no cures, and in countries where it has been tried has yielded no positive results.

Ophthalmologist Dr. Mick Vanden Bosch argues, “as a board certified physician, I can tell you that regardless of what others say, this initiated measure allows what is medically defined as cloning.  As a doctor, I want to invest in responsible science that works and has developed cures for over seventy three diseases.  If this measure passes, research dollars currently in effective research could be redirected to areas that have not yielded any positive results in countries where they have been tried.  I don’t want my patients to not have access to cures they need because research dollars have been re-directed to unproductive areas.”

The initiated measure must collect 16,776 signatures to be placed on the 2010 General Election ballot by April 6, 2010. According to the South Dakota Secretary of State, once on the ballot, there is a thirty six percent success rate in passing initiated measures.

2 Responses to “South Dakota Group Announces Opposition to Repeal of Embryonic Stem Cell Research Ban”

  1. NCSL's data cited in this article is a little misleading. As an bi-partisan organization, NCSL does not rank states, nor does it take a position on issues.
    The data is this article was taken from our website which states: “State laws on the issue vary widely. Approaches to stem cell research policy range from statutes in California, Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York, which encourage embryonic stem cell research, to South Dakota's law, which strictly forbids research on embryos regardless of the source.” Thank you and feel free to contact NCSL with any further questions.

  2. NCSL's data cited in this article is a little misleading. As an bi-partisan organization, NCSL does not rank states, nor does it take a position on issues.
    The data is this article was taken from our website which states: “State laws on the issue vary widely. Approaches to stem cell research policy range from statutes in California, Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York, which encourage embryonic stem cell research, to South Dakota's law, which strictly forbids research on embryos regardless of the source.” Thank you and feel free to contact NCSL with any further questions.