Marijuana Problem Growing Among Children in South Dakota

Marijuana Problem Growing Among Children in South Dakota

Cannabis (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Cannabis (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

While certain criminals in our community push the legalization of pot, children are getting caught up in addictions and the problems associated with recreational drug use.

From KELO:

Drug prevention experts are starting to see a disturbing trend in the state. Marijuana has become the number one substance children under 18 are being treated for in South Dakota, more than alcohol and meth.

In 2008, more than 1,500 children were treated for marijuana use in South Dakota; that’s one hundred more than were treated for alcohol abuse. Experts say increased efforts to keep kids away from alcohol and meth may have allowed marijuana to slip through the cracks.

I have a friend who has struggled mightily for a long time to break his addiction to marijuana. He sees the harm it brings to himself and his relationships, as well as the risks to which he exposes himself and his family, but habits are hard to break.

It’s tough enough for him to fight it with the substance being totally illegal. If it were made legal–and thus more easily obtainable without risk–that would make his fight to be free of this intoxicant much more difficult.

Meanwhile, we have a number of people in our state who insist it should be legalized…or at least legalized for so-called “medical” use (which would muddy the waters and make enforcement for recreational use much more difficult as it has in California.

Our state and our communities will not be a better place with more intoxicated people…and more intoxicated children.

14 Responses to “Marijuana Problem Growing Among Children in South Dakota”

  1. Marijuana will never go away. Since it will never go away we are left with two choices. The first choice, let the cartels, drug dealers and taliban continue to make billions of dollars off of it selling it to whatever age they want to. Or, legalize it, put regulations and age limits on it like alcohol and have a better chance of keeping it away from kids. Remember, it will never go away so why waste billions fighting it, while criminal organizations MAKE billions off of it.
    The American Medical Association is also saying it has medical value now, if you are not a doctor you cannot make a determination about what has medical value or not

  2. So you really think our country and our communities will be a better place with more intoxicated people?

    Murder, theft, rape and more will never go away. Since it will never go away we are left with two choices: The first choice is to allow cops, lawyers, judges, etc. to make lots of money. Or, legalize murder, theft, rape, et al, put regulations and age limits on them and have a better chance of keeping kids from committing these acts. Remember, it will never go away, so why waste billions fighting it, while shyster lawyers make millions off it.

    Make sense? Ready to jump on board?

    Or is your defeatist idea just that: a cowardly cop-out in the face of a threat to our children and public safety in general?

    Many other illegal drugs also have medicinal value. For example, are you ready to legalize cocaine and heroine? You might be, but I don't think most Americans are that nuts.

    Better to take a stand against a problem, instead of trying to come up with ways where you (think you) can live with it.

  3. KELO and Dakota Voice make it sound like these kids are addicted and “seeking” treatment. The fact is the overwhelming majority of this “treatment” is forced on these youngsters because they were caught possessing. It's part of their punishment. This is a common tactic used by the prohibitionists. The fact is young people consistently report that it is easier for them to buy weed then it is to buy alcohol. Why do you think that is?

  4. So you think it's a good thing that children are intoxicated?

  5. Why do you think it is easy for children to get it? There is a black market and when there is a black market there is crime. Why do children have a hard time getting alcohol its legal and monitored. If we legalized MJ kids would have a harder time getting it (like boose).
    And as for the kids beeing treated for MJ I laugh a you for printing that. One, at least there not on meth. Two, they should treat the addiction. These children are probably addicted to suger and TV. Removing the pot does not stop addictive ways. Your thinking will erode what is left of our personal rights. But something tells me that you are old and know that your rights die with you and the rest of our rights matter not to you for Im not you and im wrong,…..right?

  6. You've apparently smoked so much of this wacky weed that you can't even think straight.

    Legalize pot and there'll be less of it going around? Okay, put the joint down, give yourself a few hours to clear your head (as much as you can) and think about that again. I know it's a common myth among pot heads, but get real.

    And the notion that getting intoxicated on pot is comparable to sugar and television? Being thankful they're not on meth is a little more rational, but still a cowardly response. Better that they not be intoxicated on anything.

    You may be willing to give up on sober mindedness, but rational folks who care about our children, others in society, and our civilization in general are not willing to resign ourselves to a stoned environment.

  7. My point is prohibition makes it easier for children to get pot than if it were legal and regulated. Let me explain. I don't want to see kids get drugs I just see regulation as the better way to accomplish that goal.

    The problem is when you make a market illegal all that happens is you hand control of that market over to criminals. Criminals don't check their buyers for ID, that is why high school aged kids report it is easier to get weed than alcohol. Criminals also don't put warning labels on their products neither do they follow any manufacturing standards.

    After 30 years of prohibition what have we gained? Well apparently an increase in SD's youth “seeking” treatment for marijuana as pointed out by your article. We have also seen the rise (invention) of crack cocaine and meth. Cocaine and herion are as prevalent as they have ever been. Prices haven't changed much, if anything they have probably gone down. Heroin funds the Taliban who are killing our young men. So after filling our prisons and focusing our resources on drugs what have we gained? I have a friend in TX who is a county sheriff and he told me 85% of his time is spent on drug interdiction. I think we should better pick our battles.

    There are markets worth fighting like child porn, stolen credit card numbers etc… There is a finite number of resources for law enforcement and I think drugs are not worth the fight. Regulation is a better way forward and we can focus our law enforcement resources on more serious crimes. Taking back control of the drug market would give us more flexibility to fight addiction. Tobacco is a good example of a terribly addictive substance that has seen a huge decrease in use through education and taxes, all without prohibition.

  8. That's pure hogwash, and you have to know that. Anything you make legal produces more of that activity. When something is illegal, it will not stop everyone (obviously), but there are some people who have enough respect or fear of the law who will not cross that line. And even if some occasionally cross it, they will cross it less often to reduce their risk of a run-in with the law.

    After 30 years of prohibition, we have kept drug use from being higher than it otherwise would have. If even a handful of people have been saved from addiction to this intoxicant–and their families with them–then that's a plus. But it's considerably more than a handful.

    You seriously need to take a step back from your libertarian tendencies (which are not a bad thing in and of themselves), along with the load of pot-head propaganda you're regurgitating, and apply some common sense here.

    You and I also have to consider the moral component here, and I'm sure you know what I'm talking about. You cannot be sober minded when you're high on pot. I just hope you're not using; that would be a shame.

  9. KELO and Dakota Voice make it sound like these kids are addicted and “seeking” treatment. The fact is the overwhelming majority of this “treatment” is forced on these youngsters because they were caught possessing. It's part of their punishment. This is a common tactic used by the prohibitionists. The fact is young people consistently report that it is easier for them to buy weed then it is to buy alcohol. Why do you think that is?

  10. So you think it's a good thing that children are intoxicated?

  11. Why do you think it is easy for children to get it? There is a black market and when there is a black market there is crime. Why do children have a hard time getting alcohol its legal and monitored. If we legalized MJ kids would have a harder time getting it (like boose).
    And as for the kids beeing treated for MJ I laugh a you for printing that. One, at least there not on meth. Two, they should treat the addiction. These children are probably addicted to suger and TV. Removing the pot does not stop addictive ways. Your thinking will erode what is left of our personal rights. But something tells me that you are old and know that your rights die with you and the rest of our rights matter not to you for Im not you and im wrong,…..right?

  12. You've apparently smoked so much of this wacky weed that you can't even think straight.

    Legalize pot and there'll be less of it going around? Okay, put the joint down, give yourself a few hours to clear your head (as much as you can) and think about that again. I know it's a common myth among pot heads, but get real.

    And the notion that getting intoxicated on pot is comparable to sugar and television? Being thankful they're not on meth is a little more rational, but still a cowardly response. Better that they not be intoxicated on anything.

    You may be willing to give up on sober mindedness, but rational folks who care about our children, others in society, and our civilization in general are not willing to resign ourselves to a stoned environment.

  13. My point is prohibition makes it easier for children to get pot than if it were legal and regulated. Let me explain. I don't want to see kids get drugs I just see regulation as the better way to accomplish that goal.

    The problem is when you make a market illegal all that happens is you hand control of that market over to criminals. Criminals don't check their buyers for ID, that is why high school aged kids report it is easier to get weed than alcohol. Criminals also don't put warning labels on their products neither do they follow any manufacturing standards.

    After 30 years of prohibition what have we gained? Well apparently an increase in SD's youth “seeking” treatment for marijuana as pointed out by your article. We have also seen the rise (invention) of crack cocaine and meth. Cocaine and herion are as prevalent as they have ever been. Prices haven't changed much, if anything they have probably gone down. Heroin funds the Taliban who are killing our young men. So after filling our prisons and focusing our resources on drugs what have we gained? I have a friend in TX who is a county sheriff and he told me 85% of his time is spent on drug interdiction. I think we should better pick our battles.

    There are markets worth fighting like child porn, stolen credit card numbers etc… There is a finite number of resources for law enforcement and I think drugs are not worth the fight. Regulation is a better way forward and we can focus our law enforcement resources on more serious crimes. Taking back control of the drug market would give us more flexibility to fight addiction. Tobacco is a good example of a terribly addictive substance that has seen a huge decrease in use through education and taxes, all without prohibition.

  14. That's pure hogwash, and you have to know that. Anything you make legal produces more of that activity. When something is illegal, it will not stop everyone (obviously), but there are some people who have enough respect or fear of the law who will not cross that line. And even if some occasionally cross it, they will cross it less often to reduce their risk of a run-in with the law.

    After 30 years of prohibition, we have kept drug use from being higher than it otherwise would have. If even a handful of people have been saved from addiction to this intoxicant–and their families with them–then that's a plus. But it's considerably more than a handful.

    You seriously need to take a step back from your libertarian tendencies (which are not a bad thing in and of themselves), along with the load of pot-head propaganda you're regurgitating, and apply some common sense here.

    You and I also have to consider the moral component here, and I'm sure you know what I'm talking about. You cannot be sober minded when you're high on pot. I just hope you're not using; that would be a shame.