Research Analysis Finds Therapy for Unwanted Homosexuality Beneficial

j0422116One of the modern pillars upon which homosexual activists rest acceptance of homosexual behavior is the contention that homosexuals cannot change, and that reparative therapy is even harmful.

While any reparative goal can be pursued with an ineffective or counterproductive treatment, such blanket claims fly in the face of the many people who have left homosexual behavior behind through the help of ministries like Exodus.  Indeed, people have been leaving homosexuality and many other sinful behaviors behind for thousands of years.

Of course, for any behavior modification effort to be successful, the subject first must be motivated to change. Unless the subject wants to change, and unless that desire to change is very strong, success is not likely.  As someone who made several failed attempts to quit smoking and drinking (before ultimately succeeding at both), I am acutely aware of this truth.  Until a person truly faces the reality that a particular behavior is profoundly counter to their best interests, and has a strong desire to stop the behavior, casual or even moderately sincere efforts to stop probably will not work.

When one begins the work of altering their behavior, they may experience great discomfort.  This discomfort will likely be psychological and emotional, as they are not only changing a way of acting but a way of thinking and feeling, and may even manifest itself physically depending on the level of dependence on the behavior. This discomfort may even lead some to consider the behavior modification to be harmful.  But with time and determination, change is possible

According to LifeSiteNews, the  National Association for Research and Therapy of Homosexuality reviewed 125 years of reports by clinicians, researchers, and former clients in light of claims that change was impossible and that reparative therapies are harmful.

According to their report, here’s what they found:

we conclude that reorientation treatment has been shown to be beneficial—and not harmful—and therefore should continue to be available to those who seek it.

Their review of all this data also reinforced what we have seen concerning health risks from a variety of sources including the Centers for Disease Control and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health:

  • Despite knowing the AIDS risk, homosexuals repeatedly and pathologically continue to indulge in unsafe sex practices.
  • Homosexuals represent the highest number of STD cases.
  • Many homosexual sex practices are medically dangerous, with or without protection.
  • More than one-third of homosexual men and women are substance abusers.
  • Forty percent of homosexual adolescents report suicidal histories.
  • Homosexuals are more likely than heterosexuals to have mental health concerns, such as eating disorders, personality disorders, paranoia, depression, and anxiety.
  • Homosexual relationships are more violent than heterosexual relationships.
  • Societal bias and discrimination do not, in and of themselves, contribute to the majority of increased health risks for homosexuals.

When a loved one gets caught up in some self-destructive behavior such as drug abuse, alcohol abuse, gambling, or other risky behavior, we don’t lovingly tell them, “Celebrate your behavior.  You were born that way.  You can’t change and you shouldn’t try.”  No, if we truly care about them, we try anything we can to convince them to stop the behavior and choose a healthy lifestyle.

Taking the politically correct coward’s way out and condemning homosexuals to physical and spiritual risk with our silence or affirmation is not an act of love or compassion.

8 Responses to “Research Analysis Finds Therapy for Unwanted Homosexuality Beneficial”

  1. Excellent article. How on earth could anyone dispute any of this clear, plain truth?

    Is homosexuality difficult to walk away from? Extremely. Does it do any good for someone to try to “change” who isn't honestly motivated? Not a bit. Will it work for someone to try to take a shortcut to “change”? Absolutely not. Should a gay who wants to change try to jump right into normal relationships? Heck no.

    But be aware of what the preceding does *not* mean. It does *not* mean no one can or should walk away from homosexuality. There are many who have wanted to, and have succeeded, and they are all the better off for it. They are like one who didn't know how dark their little room was until they stepped into daylight for the first time.

    And what if any gay person even *potentially* could get to the point of really wanting to get healed? It would be the cruelist possible thing to discourage them from that. That's why the lie that gays are “OK” and can't “change” is so harmful.

    I read a news item once about certain deaf people who were able to take advantage of a new treatment that allowed them to hear. Guess what other deaf people did? Ostracized them! As if being in solidarity with those sharing their special “difference” was more important than being whole!

    Why would anyone ever discourage a damaged person from seeking healing, including by pretending they're not damaged? Not for any *good* reason.

  2. Greetings Bob…you knew I wouldn't let this one go without a few thoughts of my own. Ah…where to begin in pointing out the flaws in your argument and so called “facts” above. But I will get to that later

    I want to start with what I believe to be the fundamental pre-cursor question that you fail to consider. You state above “Of course, for any behavior modification effort to be successful, the subject first must be motivated to change” and I could not agree with you more, unless of course we are talking about enforced or coerced behaviour modification, brainwashing against a persons will, as it were.

    The question(s) I want to pose is this….why are they motivated to try and change? Why do they seek out this type of therapy? This is a serious question…why do they possess a self -loathing of their current state?….what factors affect that negative self-perception?

    I am interested in your thoughts.

    But before I go, I will use again a quote that I have provided to you before, from Michael Bussee, the co-founder of Exodus and now an outspoken critic of the group, he said that the “therapy”

    “does not promise change, but instead offers patients help in managing their desires and modifying their behavior to match their religious values — even if that means a life of celibacy”

    Look forward to your considered response.

    Regards

    Steve

  3. Greetings, Steve. I hope all is well with you!

    I would imagine the exact motivations for change vary, but probably involve anything from a realization that their behavior is immoral and is thus putting them out of sync with their creator, to realizing the health risks that come with the behavior and wanted to stop living so dangerously.

    There are many self-destructive and addictive behaviors out there (drugs, alcohol, gambling, various risk taking, sexual addiction, and abnormal sexual proclivities), but they all have a few things in common. One of those is that those who practice them generally know on some level–at least at first–that they are taking a risk…and sometimes this can even add to the addiction. They usually involve a “medicating” behavior or what might be described as an attempt to meet a need or void or pain in life that the specific behavior can seem on the surface to meet or treat. Also, more often than not, more and more of the activity is required to “medicate,” and the person typically loses even more sense of judgment before it's done.

    The motivation to get out of such immoral and self-destructive behaviors also have some similiarities. I've already mentioned a couple of them. At some point there is typically what is commonly known as “bottoming out,” or reaching a point in life where the pain caused by what they're doing exceeds the “medicating” benefit, and then the person begins to want to change. For some people, that point comes before a lot of damage is done; for others, it takes a tremendous amount of devastation to their lives; still others reach that point somewhere in the middle; yet others never do see the need for change.

    I suspect the reason Bussee said what you quoted was that, not knowing just where each person was in that level of realization for the need for change, and not knowing how determined they are for change, it would be extremely unwise to promise change (the counselors at the rehab I attended when I dried out from my drunkenness said I'd never make it…but I've been dry for over 15 years, so counselors can never be sure in either direction).

    And to address the remainder of what he said, I'll use drunkenness as an example since I'm most familiar with it. As I said, I've been dry for over 15 years, and within a few months of beginning that journey, I stopped having the desire to get drunk completely. I haven't had the slightest desire for almost all the time I've been dry. Other people I know who have trouble with alcohol, however, struggle with it much longer, and some struggle with it the rest of their days. Why the difference? I don't really know. I do attribute my success to God's grace…but then again, I know of other Christians–and I have no doubts about the authenticity of their faith–who for whatever reason continue to struggle.

    All I know is that if a person really wants to change, and wants it bad enough, they can…whether it's drugs, alcohol, or homosexual behavior. And if a person wants peace with God, resisting such behaviors is the only option.

    Best regards to you.

  4. Bob

    Thanks for your response. Before I continue our dialogue, I have a further question, just for clarification, so that I can ensure I fully understand your position.

    In both the article and your response you talk about “homosexual behaviour” and “behaviour modification”. In my mind there is a very clear distinction between sexual orientation and sexual behaviour. Would you agree – A person can be heterosexual i.e. their sexual attraction is towards people of the opposite sex, but not act upon that orientation i.e they are celibate. And clearly the same applies to a homosexual orientation.

    Do we agree on that point? – a distinction between orientation and acting upon that orientation i.e the behaviour flows from the orientation, and that the behaviour is clearly something which could be controlled if a person wants to and can exhibit the “will power” so to speak.

    From that flows my next question which is, do you believe, from your research, that the reparative therapy offered by organisation such as Exodus seek or claim to alter a persons sexual orientation from homosexual to heterosexual, or that they seek or claim to offer therapy designed to supress homosexual attraction and sexual behaviour thereby providing coping mechanisms and strategies for dealing with the “unwanted” same sex attractions of the participants.

    I will use your alcohol anology to make my point…a lot of people I have seen who state they are alcoholics seem to indicate that they will be an alcoholic to the day they die, but that through will power, structure & support (e.g. AA meetings and 12 step programmes etc) and learned coping mechanisms, they are able to steer clear of drinking alcohol and remain sober. The analogy being therefore is, do you think that these homosexual reparative therapy groups merely encourage the same will power, provide the structure and teach the same sort of coping mechanisms to manage the behaviour, whilst having little effect on the underlying sexual orientation.

    Look forward to your thoughts.

    Regards

    Steve

  5. I'm “off to the races” again shortly, but I'll provide a (relatively) quick response here.

    I refer to homosexual behavior versus the “orientation” for a number of reasons. The first one is probably the most important ultimately, and that is that while certain behaviors are immoral, inclinations toward those behaviors, in and of themselves, are not. For instance, most (heterosexual) men have a natural (natural as our corrupted human nature goes) inclination to want to have sex with every good looking woman they encounter. This is usually true regardless of whether they are married, or the object of their inclination is married, or both, or neither. Merely having the inclination or temptation is not wrong or immoral…but entertaining the inclination or actually giving in to it is.

    Which leads into the next reason I prefer the term “behavior” to “orientation.” Orientations, inclinations and temptations can often be changed with time and determination, but unfortunately sometimes they remain at some level or another for life. Behavior, however, can be changed instantly, on the spot, and permanently with the right motivation and determination.

    I'm not sure off the top of my head exactly what promises or claims Exodus and groups like them may make, but based on the personal testimonies I've read from several former homosexuals, it's a mix similar to those of us who are former drunks: some completely leave that inclination behind, others continue to struggle with it.

    And segueing into your final paragraph, actually I'd have to say I responded to it in the last paragraph about as well as I could. As with any reparative effort to deal with an abnormal and problematic behavior, dealing with the base inclination or temptation is always the best way of producing long-lasting results that result in the highest level of freedom for the subject. But having experienced years of day-in-day-out drunkenness, and having experienced years of day-in-day-out sobriety, it is undeniable that, even if sobriety was a struggle, it is infinitely better morally, mentally, emotionally and spiritually to be free of the unavoidable compulsion to engage in the behavior, even if the inclination was still a struggle.

    Have to run. Talk to you again soon.

  6. Bob

    Thanks for your response. Before I continue our dialogue, I have a further question, just for clarification, so that I can ensure I fully understand your position.

    In both the article and your response you talk about “homosexual behaviour” and “behaviour modification”. In my mind there is a very clear distinction between sexual orientation and sexual behaviour. Would you agree – A person can be heterosexual i.e. their sexual attraction is towards people of the opposite sex, but not act upon that orientation i.e they are celibate. And clearly the same applies to a homosexual orientation.

    Do we agree on that point? – a distinction between orientation and acting upon that orientation i.e the behaviour flows from the orientation, and that the behaviour is clearly something which could be controlled if a person wants to and can exhibit the “will power” so to speak.

    From that flows my next question which is, do you believe, from your research, that the reparative therapy offered by organisation such as Exodus seek or claim to alter a persons sexual orientation from homosexual to heterosexual, or that they seek or claim to offer therapy designed to supress homosexual attraction and sexual behaviour thereby providing coping mechanisms and strategies for dealing with the “unwanted” same sex attractions of the participants.

    I will use your alcohol anology to make my point…a lot of people I have seen who state they are alcoholics seem to indicate that they will be an alcoholic to the day they die, but that through will power, structure & support (e.g. AA meetings and 12 step programmes etc) and learned coping mechanisms, they are able to steer clear of drinking alcohol and remain sober. The analogy being therefore is, do you think that these homosexual reparative therapy groups merely encourage the same will power, provide the structure and teach the same sort of coping mechanisms to manage the behaviour, whilst having little effect on the underlying sexual orientation.

    Look forward to your thoughts.

    Regards

    Steve

  7. I'm “off to the races” again shortly, but I'll provide a (relatively) quick response here.

    I refer to homosexual behavior versus the “orientation” for a number of reasons. The first one is probably the most important ultimately, and that is that while certain behaviors are immoral, inclinations toward those behaviors, in and of themselves, are not. For instance, most (heterosexual) men have a natural (natural as our corrupted human nature goes) inclination to want to have sex with every good looking woman they encounter. This is usually true regardless of whether they are married, or the object of their inclination is married, or both, or neither. Merely having the inclination or temptation is not wrong or immoral…but entertaining the inclination or actually giving in to it is.

    Which leads into the next reason I prefer the term “behavior” to “orientation.” Orientations, inclinations and temptations can often be changed with time and determination, but unfortunately sometimes they remain at some level or another for life. Behavior, however, can be changed instantly, on the spot, and permanently with the right motivation and determination.

    I'm not sure off the top of my head exactly what promises or claims Exodus and groups like them may make, but based on the personal testimonies I've read from several former homosexuals, it's a mix similar to those of us who are former drunks: some completely leave that inclination behind, others continue to struggle with it.

    And segueing into your final paragraph, actually I'd have to say I responded to it in the last paragraph about as well as I could. As with any reparative effort to deal with an abnormal and problematic behavior, dealing with the base inclination or temptation is always the best way of producing long-lasting results that result in the highest level of freedom for the subject. But having experienced years of day-in-day-out drunkenness, and having experienced years of day-in-day-out sobriety, it is undeniable that, even if sobriety was a struggle, it is infinitely better morally, mentally, emotionally and spiritually to be free of the unavoidable compulsion to engage in the behavior, even if the inclination was still a struggle.

    Have to run. Talk to you again soon.