“If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude than the animated contest of freedom, go from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains sit lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that you were our countrymen!” – Samuel Adams

God is Just, and His Justice Cannot Sleep Forever

jeffersonmemorial

Inscription inside the Jefferson Memorial, Washington D.C.

He drafted the Declaration of Independence and was Governor of Virginia. As the 3rd U.S. President, he approved the Louisiana Purchase and had Lewis and Clark explore it. He sent the Marines to stop the Muslim Barbary Pirates of Tripoli. His name was Thomas Jefferson, born APRIL 13, 1743.

Inscribed on the Jefferson Memorial in Washington, DC are his words: “God who gave us life gave us liberty. Can the liberties of a nation be secure when we have removed a conviction that these liberties are the gift of God? Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just, that his justice cannot sleep forever.”

In his Virginia Statute of Religious Freedom, January 16, 1786, Jefferson wrote: “Almighty God hath created the mind free…All attempts to influence it by temporal punishments…tend only to begat habits of hypocrisy…and are a departure from the plan of the Holy Author of religion, who being Lord both of body and mind, yet chose not to propagate it by coercions on either, as was in His Almighty power to do, but to extend it by its influence on reason alone.”

In his 2nd Inaugural, Jefferson wrote: “I shall need, too, the favor of that Being in whose hands we are, who led our forefathers, as Israel of old.”

William J. Federer is a nationally recognized author, speaker, and president of Amerisearch, Inc, which is dedicated to researching our American heritage. The American Minute radio feature looks back at events in American history on the dates they occurred, is broadcast daily across the country and read by thousand on the internet.


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4 Responses to “God is Just, and His Justice Cannot Sleep Forever”

  1. Speaking of the Barbary pirates and Tripoli, that brings up the treaty of Tripoli which was signed by John Adams and ratified by 23 of the 32 sitting Senators. Article 11 starts out with ” As the government of the United States is not in any sense founded on the Christian religion…” This was signed by our founding fathers- ” not in ANY sense founded on the Christian religion”- makes it clear how they felt. Of course Jefferson himself was a Deist and not a follower of any one religious sect.

    Article 11, IS PRESENT on the signed official and final U.S. document. i just read it in it's entirety.

    John Adams and many of the founding fathers made it an official statement by the government.

  2. Thomas Jefferson was indeed one of the least religious and orthodox Christians among the founders. However, I don't know if it would be accurate to call him even a deist. Deism typically involves a rejection of the Bible as having any authority, and a belief that God does not intervene in the affairs of men.

    Many have taken Jefferson's “bible” in which he extracted and compiled the teachings of Christ to be an indication that he was a deist. Perhaps…but then, to have bothered to do so at all seems to indicate that at the very least he considered some of the Bible to have some authority.

    What's more, all three of the Jefferson quotes cited here (and statements Jefferson has made) indicate a belief that God will and does intervene in the affairs of men. Jefferson’s Virginia Proclamation on May 24, 1774 calling for a Day of Fasting “devoutly to implore the Divine interposition, for averting the heavy calamity which threatens destruction to our civil rights” indicates a belief that God did indeed exist, was listening to our prayers, and was expected to act based on those prayers.

    With regard to the passage you cited from the Treaty of Tripoli, as always, context is key. Unfortunately you've been misled by an all-too-common overlooking of that context. I addressed when brought up on a liberal blog a few months ago: http://www.dakotavoice.com/2008/10/confusion-at….

    This is what the subject passage says, which also contains the context that explains it:

    As the government of the United States of America is not in any sense founded on the Christian religion as it has in itself no character of enmity against the laws, religion or tranquility of Musselmen [Muslims] and as the said States have never entered into any war or act of hostility against any Mahometan nation, it is declared by the parties that no pretext arising from religious opinions shall ever produce an interruption of the harmony existing between the two countries.

    Notice the qualifier “…as it has in itself no character of enmity against the laws, religion or tranquility of Musselmen [Muslims] and as the said States have never entered into any war or act of hostility against any Mahometan nation…” In other words, since the United States is not a theocracy (i.e. not a nation with an official church or religion and not ruled by religious or other figures with an official religious fealty), there is no theological quarrel between our nation and any Muslim nations based on the laws or religion of those countries.

    Further context follows in the next phrase: “… no pretext arising from religious opinions shall ever produce an interruption of the harmony existing between the two countries.” In other words, we may have reason for disruption of harmony based on hostile acts, trade disagreements, etc., but our nations do not have a theological beef with one another.

    Again, this is a common mistake often made by people who misunderstand the difference between an official, theological Christian status as a nation, and one of character and worldview. And I am firmly convinced it is also a mistaken understanding unrelentingly exploited by secularists who realize that if they can mislead people about our origins, they can mislead people about the present…and mislead people into a destiny out of harmony with our foundations.

    I hope this context has helped.

  3. Speaking of the Barbary pirates and Tripoli, that brings up the treaty of Tripoli which was signed by John Adams and ratified by 23 of the 32 sitting Senators. Article 11 starts out with ” As the government of the United States is not in any sense founded on the Christian religion…” This was signed by our founding fathers- ” not in ANY sense founded on the Christian religion”- makes it clear how they felt. Of course Jefferson himself was a Deist and not a follower of any one religious sect.

    Article 11, IS PRESENT on the signed official and final U.S. document. i just read it in it's entirety.

    John Adams and many of the founding fathers made it an official statement by the government.

  4. Thomas Jefferson was indeed one of the least religious and orthodox Christians among the founders. However, I don't know if it would be accurate to call him even a deist. Deism typically involves a rejection of the Bible as having any authority, and a belief that God does not intervene in the affairs of men.

    Many have taken Jefferson's “bible” in which he extracted and compiled the teachings of Christ to be an indication that he was a deist. Perhaps…but then, to have bothered to do so at all seems to indicate that at the very least he considered some of the Bible to have some authority.

    What's more, all three of the Jefferson quotes cited here (and statements Jefferson has made) indicate a belief that God will and does intervene in the affairs of men. Jefferson’s Virginia Proclamation on May 24, 1774 calling for a Day of Fasting “devoutly to implore the Divine interposition, for averting the heavy calamity which threatens destruction to our civil rights” indicates a belief that God did indeed exist, was listening to our prayers, and was expected to act based on those prayers.

    With regard to the passage you cited from the Treaty of Tripoli, as always, context is key. Unfortunately you've been misled by an all-too-common overlooking of that context. I addressed when brought up on a liberal blog a few months ago: http://www.dakotavoice.com/2008/10/confusion-at….

    This is what the subject passage says, which also contains the context that explains it:

    As the government of the United States of America is not in any sense founded on the Christian religion as it has in itself no character of enmity against the laws, religion or tranquility of Musselmen [Muslims] and as the said States have never entered into any war or act of hostility against any Mahometan nation, it is declared by the parties that no pretext arising from religious opinions shall ever produce an interruption of the harmony existing between the two countries.

    Notice the qualifier “…as it has in itself no character of enmity against the laws, religion or tranquility of Musselmen [Muslims] and as the said States have never entered into any war or act of hostility against any Mahometan nation…” In other words, since the United States is not a theocracy (i.e. not a nation with an official church or religion and not ruled by religious or other figures with an official religious fealty), there is no theological quarrel between our nation and any Muslim nations based on the laws or religion of those countries.

    Further context follows in the next phrase: “… no pretext arising from religious opinions shall ever produce an interruption of the harmony existing between the two countries.” In other words, we may have reason for disruption of harmony based on hostile acts, trade disagreements, etc., but our nations do not have a theological beef with one another.

    Again, this is a common mistake often made by people who misunderstand the difference between an official, theological Christian status as a nation, and one of character and worldview. And I am firmly convinced it is also a mistaken understanding unrelentingly exploited by secularists who realize that if they can mislead people about our origins, they can mislead people about the present…and mislead people into a destiny out of harmony with our foundations.

    I hope this context has helped.