“If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude than the animated contest of freedom, go from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains sit lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that you were our countrymen!” – Samuel Adams

CIA Confirms Waterboarding Thwarted Attack on Los Angeles

Khalid Sheik Mohammad

Khalid Sheik Mohammad

The CIA stands by the use of waterboarding done on terrorist Khalid Sheik Mohammed (KSM) that motivated him to cough up information that thwarted an attack on Los Angeles, according to CNS News.

Some liberals (who seem to be more worried about making terrorists uncomfortable than they are about national security and the safety of Americans) get upset at the idea that a tiny handful of the worst terrorists out there were waterboarded (an interrogation technique that results in no real physical harm to the terrorist).

If they’re concerned about real torture, they should check some of al-Qaeda’s torture chambers. But then, we must remember that in the liberal mind these are “misunderstood persons” waging “man-made disasters” who are the victims of poverty and American imperialism. 

Their self-loathing and guilt over the success and prosperity of the United States dictates they publicly agonize over the most slightly harsh action of their own nation in wartime (a contradiction in itself) while turning a blind eye to the barbarism of our enemy. 

Regardless, this is an excerpt from  CNS News regarding what this non-invasive interrogation technique (often used on some of our own troops in training) yielded–and undoubtedly saved American lives:

Before they were subjected to “enhanced techniques” of interrogation that included waterboarding, KSM and Zubaydah were not only uncooperative but also appeared contemptuous of the will of the American people to defend themselves.

“In particular, the CIA believes that it would have been unable to obtain critical information from numerous detainees, including KSM and Abu Zubaydah, without these enhanced techniques,” says the Justice Department memo. “Both KSM and Zubaydah had ‘expressed their belief that the general US population was ‘weak,’ lacked resilience, and would be unable to ‘do what was necessary’ to prevent the terrorists from succeeding in their goals.’ Indeed, before the CIA used enhanced techniques in its interrogation of KSM, KSM resisted giving any answers to questions about future attacks, simply noting, ‘Soon you will know.’”

After he was subjected to the “waterboard” technique, KSM became cooperative, providing intelligence that led to the capture of key al Qaeda allies and, eventually, the closing down of an East Asian terrorist cell that had been tasked with carrying out the 9/11-style attack on Los Angeles.

The May 30, 2005 Justice Department memo that details what happened in this regard was written by then-Principal Deputy Attorney General Steven G. Bradbury to John A. Rizzo, the senior deputy general counsel for the CIA.

“You have informed us that the interrogation of KSM—once enhanced techniques were employed—led to the discovery of a KSM plot, the ‘Second Wave,’ ‘to use East Asian operatives to crash a hijacked airliner into’ a building in Los Angeles,” says the memo.

“You have informed us that information obtained from KSM also led to the capture of Riduan bin Isomuddin, better known as Hambali, and the discover of the Guraba Cell, a 17-member Jemaah Islamiyah cell tasked with executing the ‘Second Wave,’” reads the memo. “More specifically, we understand that KSM admitted that he had [redaction] large sum of money to an al Qaeda associate [redaction] … Khan subsequently identified the associate (Zubair), who was then captured. Zubair, in turn, provided information that led to the arrest of Hambali. The information acquired from these captures allowed CIA interrogators to pose more specific questions to KSM, which led the CIA to Hambali’s brother, al Hadi. Using information obtained from multiple sources, al-Hadi was captured, and he subsequently identified the Garuba cell.

Thousands of people in Los Angeles may owe their lives to the information obtained by waterboarding KSM.  

Many liberals seem unwilling or incapable of understanding that while we interrogate to save innocent lives, terrorists employ sadistic torture with the intent to inflict pain and terror.  It was done in rare, exigent circumstances to obtain life-saving information…and done without real physical damage to the bloodthirsty terrorist.

Of course, all this weak-kneed public hand-wringing over our life-saving interrogation techniques will make them far less effective if not totally ineffective in any future situations.

Once again, we have allowed liberals to take a useful tool for defending the country and saving lives and throw it on the trash pile.


Try us out at the new location: American Clarion!


22 Responses to “CIA Confirms Waterboarding Thwarted Attack on Los Angeles”

  1. American soldiers were waterboarded by Japanese troops during WW2. You know what we did to them? We executed them. Waterboarding is torture. Torture is a war crime. Waterboarding done to American soldiers is punishable by death.

    No real physical harm is done to people who are waterboarded? You can die from being waterboarded! You are being drowned.

    Again, the fact that Al Qaeda tortures people doesn't mean it's alright to. They're terrorists! Of course they break the law! Your suggestion that American soldiers should engage in the same type of behavior as terrorist criminals is insulting.

    The problem with information extracted from torture is that it's unreliable. When you are being drowned, you will say anything to make it stop, true or not. KSM was waterboarded 118 times! If torture is so effective, why didn't it work on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, or 79th time?

    Don't get me wrong, I understand the significance behind the ticking time bomb scenario, and I would have a hard time not doing whatever it took to get the information out of the terrorist, but I would also recognize that in doing so I had committed a crime, and I would expect to pay for it.

  2. On a friendlier note, your Navy promotional poster is the most awesome thing I've seen in awhile. Don't mess with the SEALS.

  3. Interestingly, you forgot to mention the part about the Japanese beating the crap out of our soldiers and jumping on top of their stomachs during the waterboarding. That is indeed torture, and something we don't do to the terrorists.

    We also don't do it to our own troops when they are sometimes waterboarded during SERE training. Having been in the military, I can testify that military life is no picnic, but we don't torture our own troops. I have seen troops in my own training unit pushed beyond reasonable limits to the point that injury resulted; the waterboarding KSM got was a lot milder than what I saw, and the military trainers responsible were not tried for torture, nor should they have been.

    A more mature, rational and less naive perspective would be in order, along with the realization that war can't be accomplished with Roberts Rules of Order and a pillow fight. Sometimes you have to get a little rough with the enemy…and can do so without inflicting torture.

    One thing you're right about is that information obtained during waterboarding may be unreliable. That is why it would only be used when the likelihood is very high that the subject has vital information, and that vital information can be verified. Our defense forces aren't going to waterboard on the basis of a wild goose chase, and to do so might flirt with torture…but they don't.

    The real criminal and inhumane activity is perpetrated by our enemies with their drills, knives, chains, blow torches and other toys…and our mild waterboarding of a handful of key subjects helps prevent further incidents of such barbarism.

    KSM may have been right about one thing: I fear that as a whole, we may be weak and lack the will to win the conflict with terrorism. The evidence grows stronger almost every day.

  4. Thanks. I actually got it from Patriot Post, so the credit is theirs.

    I have the honor of knowing a SEAL who's home on leave at the moment and gave him atta-boys a few days ago on behalf of the fine work of his colleagues.

  5. The ring leader of the LA Library Tower attack plot was arrested in February 2002. Enhanced interrogation techniques (a.k.a. torture) did not begin until August 2002. So it's chronologically impossible that torture led to the intel to stop this attack.

  6. We don't torture.

  7. What? You admit it in the title of your post- “Waterboarding Thwarted LA Attack.” Waterboarding, drowning someone to obtain information, IS torture according to every national and international body that defines what constitutes torture.

    Daniel Levin, an assistant attorney general under the Bush Aministration went to SERE and had himself waterboarded to see what it was like. He wrote back a memo to the White House in which he said, “if waterboarding does not constitute torture, then there is no such thing as torture. Believe me. It's torture.” He was then forced out of the Justice Department.

  8. Nooooooooooooo…as I have said countless times, waterboarding is NOT torture.

    If you truly do not understand what torture is, check out the links I provided above to the activities of your terrorist friends. THEY torture, and provide fine examples of what torture really is.

    Apparently Levin is a wus. Many in our military get waterboarded during training, and they do just fine. It leaves no physical damage…unlike the “interrogation” techniques of our enemies. As I also said, I have seen military training that has done considerably more physical damage than the non-existent physical damage done by waterboarding.

    Do America a favor and just grow up.

  9. Oh, and you should get down on your knees and profusely thank God that our military is made of sterner stuff than you apparently are.

    If they weren't you would likely be kneeling down and praying toward Mecca several times a day…if you were still alive at all.

  10. It seems that the man you supported for President and who I think we both would agree knows a bit about what torture is would disagree with your opinion on waterboarding.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/11/29/polit

  11. “waterboarding is NOT torture”

    Name one report from the CIA, FBI, or NSA that says its not. Name one prominent legal attorney who would say its not. Why is waterboarding training to resist torture done to soldiers at SERE if it’s not torture?

    “I have seen military training that has done considerably more physical damage than the non-existent physical damage done by waterboarding.”

    People have died in American detention facilities in Iraq, Afganistan, and Guantanamo. I doubt it was because they were hugged to death.

    “Oh, and you should get down on your knees and profusely thank God”

    If I ever wrote a blog post supporting torture, I think I would need to ask for forgiveness instead.

    “our military is made of sterner stuff than you apparently are”

    Really? So doing something that is illegal not only according to international but American law as well makes you tough huh? So when the Gestapo waterboarded American troops they weren’t being immoral, they were just made of sterner stuff than me? I see.

  12. Supported for lack of a better option. Sadly, McCain should know more about torture, and undoubtedly does know more about torture, since he as subjected to real torture during his stay at the Hanoi Hilton.

    And since you liberals can't seem to understand what real torture is, let me spell out for you a little of what McCain went through (that these terrorist thugs were spared): denied medical care even though both arms and a leg were broken during his crash along with being stabbed in the foot and groin during his capture, being bound up tightly with ropes and left for hours, being thrown to the ground, having his already-broken leg stomped on, and generally beaten repeatedly in countless ways for days on end.

    (Meanwhile, one of the guys behind the 911 attacks that killed nearly 3,000 innocent Americans and other terrorist attacks was…made to feel like he was drowning…to stop more killing of innocent civilians. Oh, the horror.)

    For reasons I don't quite understand, in the late 1990s McCain threw his principles mostly to the wind in an attempt to win media and other liberal love.

    The guy was a great man, a great conservative through most of his career, and still gets props for his military service…but he just sold out in a quest for media adoration.

    I'm sure much of what he says is still true, but his proclivity for looking for liberal love has led him to say some pretty inane things–and this is one of them.

    KSM seems to have been right about one thing: it looks like we are a weak people, incapable of fighting evil. We are incapable because we no longer know how to recognize true evil.

  13. You don't get it because you refuse to get it. You're too invested in hating Bush and self flagellation to be reasonable.

    If you think the US military tortures its own troops with waterboarding, why don't we torture them with drills and electrical wires as well to prepare them for that? You're not really that stupid, are you?

    If you liberals spent 1/3 as much time calling-out and standing firm against the evil of our enemies as you whining about our efforts to keep our nation safe, we would be nearly invulnerable.

    I'm done indulging your infantile anti-American idiocy. I'll dialog with anyone who can maintain some level of rationality, but you have no interest…or your moral compass is so unused for so long that you lack the capacity to recognize evil when you see it. Liberals of today have provided a living example of Isaiah 5:20.

    There are plenty of anti-American liberal websites out there that would welcome your drivel. I suggest you find one because I'm done indulging this kind of enemy-sympathetic crap here. You're broadcasting to the world that KSM was right, and I will not be a part of that.

  14. The law firm where Mr. Levin currently is employed lists his background and experience: “Mr. Levin has worked on numerous internal investigations, including investigations involving alleged accounting irregularities, alleged options backdating, alleged improper payments, and other issues. He has extensive experience with complex civil matters and represents clients in securities fraud class actions; intellectual property litigation; appellate matters involving adverse products liability verdicts and arbitrations.”

    Strangely, they make no mention of his alleged expertise in interrogation techniques, particularly “waterboarding.”

    All of us who served in the military have had to undergo “the gas chamber.” Trainees are herded into a small, closed building and are instructed to put on their gas masks. Then the room is filed with CS gas (tear gas). On command, everyone removes their masks are are forbidden to replace them for several minutes. It is natural for trainees to tightly close their eyes and hold their breaths, but eventually can hold it no longer and begin gasping for air, filing their lungs with the incredibly acrid substance, which then causes spasms of coughing. The trainees are then instructed to retrieve and don their gas masks, all of which have been scattered on the floor. Each person must find their own mask before they are allowed to put them on and to do so requires opening the eyes and taking a deep breath of the noxious chemical so as to “clear the mask once back in place.

    Anyone who has experienced this would certainly consider it tortuous. No one thought to call his congressman and complain of torture in the US military. It was part of our training and gave us confidence in our equipment and our abilities. If the same thing were done just for the sake of watching men suffer, it would most assuredly be called torture.

    Waterboarding is a technique that causes considerable discomfort, even panic, applied for a specific reason under tightly controlled conditions, with no lasting ill effects. That there have been innumerable people willing to undergo the procedure in order to advance a politically agenda should tell us something. I haven't heard of anyone volunteering to have their eyes gouged out or to have their hearts cooked in their heaving chests by application of a blow-torch or to have their skin peeled from their backs then subjected to battery acid, have you? That also tells me something.

  15. Another good point, Dr. Theo. I had forgotten about the gas chamber, but it's a good point about unpleasant circumstances through which many military trainees must go.

    I recall that the set of instructors my unit had (a hard-core bunch of instructors) used something like 3x the usual number of of CS canisters in the room for our exercise, so the mixture in that room was very rich. One gal who had been Army before transferring over to the Air Force (the branch I was in) was talking smack before we went in the chamber, about how all us AF sissies were going to have a hard time in there…and she came running out coughing, retching, nose pouring and whatnot worse than most of us AF sissies.

    Anyway, back to your point, many military people–even Air Force sissies like me–have been through as bad or worse than these murderous terrorists were put through in a time-sensitive effort to save American lives.

    This overweening sympathy for terrorists on the part of some makes me angry, but it also makes me very sad that a significant number of my countrymen lack the fortitude and reason to view this issue from a rational perspective.

  16. The law firm where Mr. Levin currently is employed lists his background and experience: “Mr. Levin has worked on numerous internal investigations, including investigations involving alleged accounting irregularities, alleged options backdating, alleged improper payments, and other issues. He has extensive experience with complex civil matters and represents clients in securities fraud class actions; intellectual property litigation; appellate matters involving adverse products liability verdicts and arbitrations.”

    Strangely, they make no mention of his alleged expertise in interrogation techniques, particularly “waterboarding.”

    All of us who served in the military have had to undergo “the gas chamber.” Trainees are herded into a small, closed building and are instructed to put on their gas masks. Then the room is filed with CS gas (tear gas). On command, everyone removes their masks are are forbidden to replace them for several minutes. It is natural for trainees to tightly close their eyes and hold their breaths, but eventually can hold it no longer and begin gasping for air, filing their lungs with the incredibly acrid substance, which then causes spasms of coughing. The trainees are then instructed to retrieve and don their gas masks, all of which have been scattered on the floor. Each person must find their own mask before they are allowed to put them on and to do so requires opening the eyes and taking a deep breath of the noxious chemical so as to “clear” the mask once back in place.

    Anyone who has experienced this would certainly consider it tortuous. No one thought to call his congressman and complain of torture in the US military. It was part of our training and gave us confidence in our equipment and our abilities. If the same thing were done just for the sake of watching men suffer, it would most assuredly be called torture.

    Waterboarding is a technique that causes considerable discomfort, even panic, applied for a specific reason under tightly controlled conditions, with no lasting ill effects. That there have been innumerable people willing to undergo the procedure in order to advance a political agenda should tell us something. I haven't heard of anyone volunteering to have their eyes gouged out or to have their hearts cooked in their heaving chests by application of a blow-torch or to have their skin peeled from their backs then subjected to battery acid, have you? That also tells me something.

  17. Another good point, Dr. Theo. I had forgotten about the gas chamber, but it's a good point about unpleasant circumstances through which many military trainees must go.

    I recall that the set of instructors my unit had (a hard-core bunch of instructors) used something like 3x the usual number of of CS canisters in the room for our exercise, so the mixture in that room was very rich. One gal who had been Army before transferring over to the Air Force (the branch I was in) was talking smack before we went in the chamber, about how all us AF sissies were going to have a hard time in there…and she came running out coughing, retching, nose pouring and whatnot worse than most of us AF sissies.

    Anyway, back to your point, many military people–even Air Force sissies like me–have been through as bad or worse than these murderous terrorists were put through in a time-sensitive effort to save American lives.

    This overweening sympathy for terrorists on the part of some makes me angry, but it also makes me very sad that a significant number of my countrymen lack the fortitude and reason to view this issue from a rational perspective.