“If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude than the animated contest of freedom, go from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains sit lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that you were our countrymen!” – Samuel Adams

A Peculiar Providential Occurrence

American Minute from William J. Federer

AUGUST 27, 1776, British General Howe trapped 8,000 American troops on Brooklyn Heights. Desperate, Washington ferried his army all night across the East River.

Morning came yet half his troops were still in danger. A fog allowed the entire army to be evacuated. Never again did the British have such a chance to trap the American army.

Major Ben Tallmadge, Washington’s Chief of Intelligence, wrote: “As the dawn of the next day approached, those of us who remained in the trenches became very anxious for our own safety, and when the dawn appeared there were several regiments still on duty. At this time a very dense fog began to rise off the river, and it seemed to settle in a peculiar manner over both encampments. I recollect this peculiar providential occurrence perfectly well, and so very dense was the atmosphere that I could scarcely discern a man at six yards distance…We tarried until the sun had risen, but the fog remained as dense as ever.”

Connecticut Governor Jonathan Trumbull had written to General George Washington, July 13, 1775: “May the God of the armies of Israel shower down the blessings of his Divine Providence…in the day of battle and danger.”

William J. Federer is a nationally recognized author, speaker, and president of Amerisearch, Inc, which is dedicated to researching our American heritage. The American Minute radio feature looks back at events in American history on the dates they occurred, is broadcast daily across the country and read by thousand on the internet.


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